Git Merge 2019: February 01

One conference. All things Git.

From technical talks to hands-on workshops, developers of all experience levels will find new ways to use and build on Git across a full day of sessions.

Get Your Ticket

January 31 – workshops

February 01 – main conference

About

About Git Merge

Git Merge is a one-day conference (with an add-on Workshop Day) dedicated to the version control tool that started it all—and the people who use it every day. Through technical sessions and hands-on workshops, developers and teams of all experience levels will find new ways to use, build on, and scale Git.

This event is dedicated to amplifying new voices in the Git community and to showcasing the most thought-provoking projects from contributors, maintainers and community managers around the world.

Git Merge 2019 will take place in Brussels on Friday, February 1 with pre-conference workshops scheduled for Thursday, January 31.

All ticket proceeds are donated to the Software Freedom Conservancy.

Speakers

Speakers

  • Deb Nicholson headshot

    Deb Nicholson

    Director of Community Operations, Software Freedom Conservancy

    Deb Nicholson is the Director of Community Operations at the Software Freedom Conservancy where she supports the work of its member organizations and facilitates collaboration with the wider free software community. She won the O’Reilly Open Source Award for her volunteer work with GNU MediaGoblin, a federated media-hosting service and OpenHatch, free software's welcoming committee. She is a founding organizer of the Seattle GNU/Linux Conference, an annual event dedicated to surfacing new voices and welcoming new people to the free software community.

    Session

    10:00 | Feb 1

    Future of software

    Sculpting the future of technology is a big responsibility and to do it right, we're going to need lots of thoughtful people. Welcoming the next generation of free software developers and users is our most important job. Those of us who build tools *and* communities are uniquely placed to ensure an empowering future for free software and the world we're building it for!

  • Ivan Frade headshot

    Ivan Frade

    Software Engineer, Google

    Ivan Frade is a software engineer passionate about open source. He contributed to the GNOME desktop through the Nokia's Maemo and Meego platforms, and he is still proud of the (admittedly niche) N900 phone. At Nokia he worked in the Tracker project, organizing the user information in a graph. After a progressive drift from embedded to cloud, from Europe to the Bay Area and from graphs to... well, to graphs, he recently joined the Git server team in Google.

    Session

    10:30 | Feb 1

    Tales in scalability: how Google has seen users break Git

    Google runs a Git hosting service that handles 100s of thousands of repositories of all shapes and sizes. We host Android, which contains huge binary assets and employs >1000 distinct repositories, and Chromium, a monorepo with >1750 unique committers last year. Both projects see high volumes of code review traffic and employ significant automation (build bots, auto mergers). We see bursts of >20 updates/second in individual repositories, and a bug fix in one branch can trigger a cascade of automated updates to other branches and repositories.

    This talk will provide tales from the trenches of seeing Git stretched to new limits, the work that has motivated, and how Google monitors its hosting service to ensure Git can continue to scale.

  • Katrina Uychaco headshot

    Katrina Uychaco

    Software Engineer, GitHub

    Katrina is a software engineer at GitHub, where she works on Atom, GitHub’s free and open source text editor. Formerly a medical device engineer, Katrina found her passion in building software — specifically building awesome software to better facilitate building more awesome software. She’s a lover of elegant abstractions, all things meta, and tools and tricks that improve the development process. When Katrina’s not using Atom to hack on Atom, she’s often working to empower other engineers through teaching, mentoring, or organizing events for Bay Area women in tech.

    Session

    Session info coming soon

  • Minh Thai headshot

    Minh Thai

    Software Engineer, Google

    Working at the Git server team at Google to serve Git data fast everywhere.

    Session

    10:30 | Feb 1

    Tales in scalability: how Google has seen users break Git

    Google runs a Git hosting service that handles 100s of thousands of repositories of all shapes and sizes. We host Android, which contains huge binary assets and employs >1000 distinct repositories, and Chromium, a monorepo with >1750 unique committers last year. Both projects see high volumes of code review traffic and employ significant automation (build bots, auto mergers). We see bursts of >20 updates/second in individual repositories, and a bug fix in one branch can trigger a cascade of automated updates to other branches and repositories.

    This talk will provide tales from the trenches of seeing Git stretched to new limits, the work that has motivated, and how Google monitors its hosting service to ensure Git can continue to scale.

  • Johan Abildskov headshot

    Johan Abildskov

    Trainer & Consultant, Praqma

    Johan is a trainer & consultant at Praqma, companies in Scandinavia move towards Git, Continuous Delivery and a DevOps mindset. Johan maintains the Git katas and would love to hear more about your software.

    Session

    11:00 | Feb 1

    The what, how and why of scaling repositories

    Perhaps even more controversial than rebase vs. merge is Mono vs Many-repos. During my consultancy career I've helped companies go in either directions, with good reasons for both transitions. This talk will remove the gut-feeling part of deciding your repository structure, and instead dive into the available tools and considerations for deciding what is the right repository structure for your organisation based on science and technology.

  • Brian M. Carlson headshot

    Brian M. Carlson

    Git Ecosystem Engineer, GitHub

    Brian is a Git Ecosystem Engineer at GitHub. He has been working on Git for five years, focusing mostly on the hash function transition, Kerberos support, and usability improvements.

    Session

    11:40 | Feb 1

    Bridging the gap: transitioning Git to SHA-256

    Git has long used SHA-1 to identify objects in its datastore, but recent cryptanalytic advances have rendered SHA-1 weak. There's ongoing work to transition to SHA-256, which is more secure. We'll cover the transition plan, where we are with it, what's involved in the transition work, and how we're going to provide interoperability between versions of Git using different hash algorithms.

  • Briana Swift headshot

    Briana Swift

    Trainer, GitHub

    With a background in creative arts and software development curriculum, Briana collaborates with teams and individuals working with the visionary tools available through Git and GitHub. Through a positive and energetic approach, she helps others achieve their own exciting new ventures through the use of these innovative technologies.

    Session

    Session info coming soon

  • Anna Nagy headshot

    Anna Nagy

    Product Manager, Travis CI

    Anna Nagy is a Product Manager at Travis CI, where she concentrates on analytics and infrastructure. She's also a support engineering veteran, through which she learned the ins-and-outs of building accessible processes and tooling for knowledge sharing. Anna cares deeply about promoting access to tech and learning, and co-organizes for Boston's Global Diversity CFP Day Community and Rails Girls Summer of Code.

    Session

    12:20 | Feb 1

    ⚡️ - Good ways to use Git for things that are not code

    Together we’ll explore lessons learned from using git for source control on a handful of non-code community and business domains. We'll look at the example of internal documentation, external documentation - both formal and informal, and corporate blogs as areas where long text files are managed by git and collaborative reviews and writing is done through GitHub. This can be a very successful approach - but it also comes with it's drawbacks. In particular, we'll look closely at the technical barrier of entry to using git as a source control tool in an involvement-driven corporate and community culture, the impact of assumptions that technical users make about the appropriate tooling to use, and ideas about whether you’ll want to try and scale git-managed documentation and other text artifacts for their company or community.

  • John Austin headshot

    John Austin

    Founder / Technical Lead, A Stranger Gravity, Funomena

    John Austin is a developer and designer currently living in San Francisco, California. He has been making games for nearly 12 years and has worked at Google, Microsoft, Funomena, and others. He founded and currently leads the studio, A Stranger Gravity, seeking to build thoughtful, accessible experiences that seek to enrich the lives of people across the world.

    Session

    13:30 | Feb 1

    Git for games: current problems and solutions

    Git is *the* source control system of the modern era. Yet, the vast majority of AAA game studios still use Perforce, SVN, and other more traditional systems. It’s not for a lack of desire, rather, game developers have a unique set of constraints and workflows that make Git unsuitable for the task.

    This talk will illustrate how game workflows are unique, why Git doesn’t currently support these workflows (even with LFS), and introduce a new tool, Git Global Graph, that strives to build a path for even the largest AAA developer to use Git. We’ll explore constraints on Game Development workflows and introduce the Git Global Graph project, a tool designed to solve the above challenges without compromising on the fundamental structures and benefits of Git.

  • Belén Barros Pena headshot

    Belén Barros Pena

    Interaction Designer, Open Source Design

    I have been an interaction designer and user researcher for over 10 years. 5 of those I've spent designing software engineering tools, and free / open source software. I believe engineers are humans too, and therefore deserve useful, usable and (why not?) beautiful software tools to do their jobs.

    Session

    14:00 | Feb 1

    The art of patience: why you should bother teaching Git to designers

    While I was working as the only designer of the Yocto Project, the embedded Linux engineers in my office did something remarkable. They mustered the patience and the energy to teach Git to yours truly. They did it in stages: they started by how to clone a repository and how to check out its branches, taught me about remotes and how to create my own branches, how to commit my changes, and the etiquette of good commit messages. One glorious day, they decided I was ready to push to a remote repository. By golly I felt powerful. I had mastered Git's mysteries!

    Becoming familiar with Git's basic concepts and commands took the best part of 2 years, but it was worth every minute. As a designer, learning Git made me more resilient, more independent and more useful to my development team. Learning Git made me a better designer.

    In this talk, I will try to convince developers that they should invest time and effort in teaching Git to the designers they work with, what they have to gain from it, and how to go about it.

  • Ari Hershowitz headshot

    Ari Hershowitz

    Director of Open Government, Xcential Corporation

    Session

    14:30 | Feb 1

    ⚡️ - Version control for law: Posey Rule in the U.S. Congress

    Many people talk of 'git for law'. It's neither as simple as coders imagine, nor as complex as lawyers would make it. A new rule in the U.S. House of Representatives (the 'Posey Rule'), requires redlined prints comparing documents before and after changes in Committee.

    As a lawyer who codes, I work for the U.S. House of Representatives to build document comparison software that works for law, can track changes in law and ultimately will be able to show what the law was at any point in time.

  • Aniket Subhash Kadam headshot

    Aniket Subhash Kadam

    Consultant, Self Employed

    Been around the startup block a few times and decided to wing it by himself. Aniket brings over 5 years of development experience in fast paced environments, and some in a calm-first environment too. Git, got him through it all.

    Session

    14:40 | Feb 1

    ⚡️ - Git, the annotated notepad

    Ever forgotten what you were working on the night before and needed a few minutes to get back context? Wondering if you're writing the best code you could be? Having repetitive conversations with coworkers about your code?

    We'll go over how git can help at every stage of coding, from fleshing out your idea to coming back to it over lunch, to the best highlighting you've missed putting to use.

  • Veronica Hanus headshot

    Veronica Hanus

    Software Engineer, Self Employed

    Before Veronica was a programmer, she was a researcher (she helped pick the Mars Curiosity Rover’s landing site!) with an eye for process improvement. As she’s taught herself web development, she’s brought her research approach from her time at NASA-JPL & MIT into whatever she was learning. She loves exploring the web and teaching, and recently co-taught a PyCon tutorial on using web-scraping and modeling to predict Oscar winners. When she isn’t learning how the web can be better for developers, she enjoys blogging, nerding out about documentation, and snuggling as many cats as possible.

    Session

    15:00 | Feb 1

    Version control for visual learners

    Can you remember the difference between two hex color values? Me neither! Entering visual representations of recently-changed elements into version control makes review of past changes easier & speeds acclimation to a new web project, especially for visual learners. Surprisingly, methods for including images in your version control aren’t standardized and are rarely used outside of large companies, and the rest of us are left checking out every major commit and viewing changes locally! Join me for a review of methods currently in use and discuss the benefits and drawbacks of each.

  • Daniel Madalitso Phiri headshot

    Daniel Madalitso Phiri

    GitHub Campus Expert, Student

    Daniel is a Developer Evangelist at Hasura, a GitHub Campus Expert and the Community Lead at Uniphyd, a student developer community at Parul University, India. He is a big believer in the role community plays in a developers career. He is passionate about the positive change code can bring about in peoples lives.

    Session

    16:20 | Feb 1

    ⚡️ - Attracting the next generation of Git users

    I teach Git to students who, most of the time, are hearing about it for the first time. Today I’ll share major problems that I faced while teaching Git to beginners, both technical and non-technical, and how I overcame them. I'll also go through how I crafted the content of my workshops and presented it in a way that people new to Git have a smoother journey getting started. Lastly, I'll go through using your new content to attract the next generation of Git users.

  • Javier Fontan headshot

    Javier Fontan

    Senior Software Developer, source[d]

    Javi works as an engineer at source{d} developing tools to retrieve and analyze git repositories. Previously he did system administration tasks alongside unix bearded people and helped to create OpenNebula Virtual Machine manager.

    Session

    16:30 | Feb 1

    ⚡️ - Gitbase, SQL interface to Git repositories

    At source{d} we analyze a huge amount of git repositories and extract insights on source code. To do this we have created a powerful engine for language-agnostic analysis of your source code and git history. The git history part of the analysis is handled by Gitbase, an SQL database engine that is able to understand git repositories and is MySQL protocol compatible. You'll learn about our journey, from what began as a side project to the current state, its internals and the different solutions we approached.

  • Ben Greenberg headshot

    Ben Greenberg

    Developer Advocate, Nexmo

    Ben is a second career developer who previously spent a decade in the fields of adult education, community organizing and non-profit management. He works as a developer advocate for Nexmo, the Vonage API Platform by day and experiments with open source projects at night. He writes regularly on the intersection of community development and tech. Originally from Southern California and a long time resident of New York City, Ben now resides near Tel Aviv.

    Session

    17:10 | Feb 1

    How a Git based education cultivates more resilient developers

    A coding education that not only incorporates Git into its education but forms its educational program around Git produces more resilient and more capable developers who can enter a business landscape and grapple with complex challenges. How does structuring an educational program around Git accomplish that? As a former technical coach at the Flatiron School I have helped numerous emerging programmers learn the fundamentals of software development and, more importantly, grapple with breaking a problem down into its smallest parts and have done so through using a "Git approach". This not only teaches good version control but cultivates a genuine trouble shooting mindset that can tackle multifaceted problems and issues, both in the code and in the logic underlying a program. Come and discover how Git is not only the premier version control software but is also a powerful educational tool.

  • James Ramsay headshot

    James Ramsay

    Product Manager, GitLab

    James began programming at a young age and studied Computer Science before moving to product management six years ago. Outside of work he enjoys cycling, wine, and jazz. He still enjoys programming and regularly tinkers with new languages and tools.

    Session

    Session info coming soon

  • John Briggs headshot

    John Briggs

    Engineering Manager, Microsoft

    John is the engineering manager for the Git ecosystem team in Azure DevOps. His team is tasked with helping Git scale to support some of the largest repositories in the world with contributions to core Git, Git for Windows, and VFS for Git. Previously, John worked on the version control web experiences for Azure Repos and facial animation middleware for the games industry.

    Session

    16:40 | Feb 1

    Technical contributions towards scaling for Windows

  • Pamela Corbin-Audoux headshot

    Pamela Corbin-Audoux

    Director, EMEA Marketing, GitHub

    Pamela does her best to be wired and a bit weird. When she is not dissecting words to find anagrams, she combines them to tell stories about the human side of innovation and technology. Her story as a Hubber started on Valentine’s Day, 2017. After writing this bio, she may or may not continue referring to herself in the third person.

    Session

    Session info coming soon

  • Brandon Williams headshot

    Brandon Williams

    Software Engineer, Facebook

    Brandon Williams grew up in Los Angeles, CA but currently resides in the Bay Area. He graduated from BYU with a Bachelor's in Electrical Engineering and UCSD with a Master's in Computer Science. He started his career at Google where he made many contributions to Git and now is at Facebook using Rust. In his spare time he likes to play D&D and build mechanical keyboards.

    Session

    12:10 | Feb 1

    ⚡️ - Git protocols: still tinkering after all these years?

    Git continues to evolve. This talk will examine recent changes to the Git protocol focusing on the introduction of protocol v2 to reduce communication overhead and increase extensibility. We will do a deep dive into the challenges of changing the way Git works, while maintaining all-important backwards compatibility.

Schedule

Schedule

Join us the day before the conference for hands-on workshops hosted by some of the best trainers in the world covering a range of Git topics. Just add on a Workshop Day Ticket to your Conference Ticket at checkout to lock in your spot—space is limited.

9:00

Registration ✏️ & Breakfast 🍩

12:00

Lunch 🍔 🥗 🍕

9:00

Registration ✏️ & Breakfast 🍩

10:30

Tales in scalability: how Google has seen users break Git

Tales in scalability: how Google has seen users break Git

Feb 1 | 10:30

Google runs a Git hosting service that handles 100s of thousands of repositories of all shapes and sizes. We host Android, which contains huge binary assets and employs >1000 distinct repositories, and Chromium, a monorepo with >1750 unique committers last year. Both projects see high volumes of code review traffic and employ significant automation (build bots, auto mergers). We see bursts of >20 updates/second in individual repositories, and a bug fix in one branch can trigger a cascade of automated updates to other branches and repositories.

This talk will provide tales from the trenches of seeing Git stretched to new limits, the work that has motivated, and how Google monitors its hosting service to ensure Git can continue to scale.

Speaker: Ivan Frade

Software Engineer, Google

Ivan Frade is a software engineer passionate about open source. He contributed to the GNOME desktop through the Nokia's Maemo and Meego platforms, and he is still proud of the (admittedly niche) N900 phone. At Nokia he worked in the Tracker project, organizing the user information in a graph. After a progressive drift from embedded to cloud, from Europe to the Bay Area and from graphs to... well, to graphs, he recently joined the Git server team in Google.

Ivan Frade headshot

Speaker: Minh Thai

Software Engineer, Google

Working at the Git server team at Google to serve Git data fast everywhere.

Minh Thai headshot

Ivan Frade

Minh Thai

11:30

Coffee Break

12:30

Lunch 🍔 🥗 🍕

14:00

The art of patience: why you should bother teaching Git to designers

The art of patience: why you should bother teaching Git to designers

Feb 1 | 14:00

While I was working as the only designer of the Yocto Project, the embedded Linux engineers in my office did something remarkable. They mustered the patience and the energy to teach Git to yours truly. They did it in stages: they started by how to clone a repository and how to check out its branches, taught me about remotes and how to create my own branches, how to commit my changes, and the etiquette of good commit messages. One glorious day, they decided I was ready to push to a remote repository. By golly I felt powerful. I had mastered Git's mysteries!

Becoming familiar with Git's basic concepts and commands took the best part of 2 years, but it was worth every minute. As a designer, learning Git made me more resilient, more independent and more useful to my development team. Learning Git made me a better designer.

In this talk, I will try to convince developers that they should invest time and effort in teaching Git to the designers they work with, what they have to gain from it, and how to go about it.

Speaker: Belén Barros Pena

Interaction Designer, Open Source Design

I have been an interaction designer and user researcher for over 10 years. 5 of those I've spent designing software engineering tools, and free / open source software. I believe engineers are humans too, and therefore deserve useful, usable and (why not?) beautiful software tools to do their jobs.

Belén Barros Pena headshot

Belén Barros Pena

14:50

Coffee Break ☕

16:00

Break & Afternoon Snack

17:10

How a Git based education cultivates more resilient developers

How a Git based education cultivates more resilient developers

Feb 1 | 17:10

A coding education that not only incorporates Git into its education but forms its educational program around Git produces more resilient and more capable developers who can enter a business landscape and grapple with complex challenges. How does structuring an educational program around Git accomplish that? As a former technical coach at the Flatiron School I have helped numerous emerging programmers learn the fundamentals of software development and, more importantly, grapple with breaking a problem down into its smallest parts and have done so through using a "Git approach". This not only teaches good version control but cultivates a genuine trouble shooting mindset that can tackle multifaceted problems and issues, both in the code and in the logic underlying a program. Come and discover how Git is not only the premier version control software but is also a powerful educational tool.

Speaker: Ben Greenberg

Developer Advocate, Nexmo

Ben is a second career developer who previously spent a decade in the fields of adult education, community organizing and non-profit management. He works as a developer advocate for Nexmo, the Vonage API Platform by day and experiments with open source projects at night. He writes regularly on the intersection of community development and tech. Originally from Southern California and a long time resident of New York City, Ben now resides near Tel Aviv.

Ben Greenberg headshot

Ben Greenberg

17:40 - 20:00

Cocktail Reception

Experience

Experience

01

Getting to Git Merge

Travel tips for every leg of your trip.

Git Merge will be held at The Egg, situated in the heart of Brussels, a short distance from the Midi/Zuid Station.

Where: The Egg, Bara Street 175, 1070 Brussels, Belgium

When: Feb 1st, 2019 9am-5:45pm

By plane: BRU airport

By train: Bruxelles-Midi/Zuid, served by Thalys, Eurostar, TGV®, and ICE trains

By car: Street parking is available, but we recommend using a car share service such as Uber

By public transport: Stib, De Lijn, TEC

You’ll find a variety of hotels and AirBnBs near the venue.

02

Workshop Day

Git users of all levels are invited to deep-dive into a variety of topics with some of the best Git trainers in the world. Check out the Schedule. Space is limited and advance registration is required. A light breakfast and lunch are provided.

January 31st, 9am-5pm

The Egg

03

Cocktail Reception

We’ll be closing out the day with a cocktail reception at The Egg. Unwind from the day, mingle with attendees, and enjoy a cocktail and light bites.

February 1st, 5:45pm-8pm

The Egg

04

Beyond Git Merge

Looking for more to do while in town? Join nearby events hosted by our sponsors. More details coming soon.

FAQ

FAQ

Can I get a receipt for my ticket?
Yes, send us a note at events@github.com.
Can I attend workshops if I didn’t purchase a Workshop Day ticket when I bought my Conference Ticket?
Space is extremely limited and is reserved for conference ticket holders. To attend, please purchase a bundled ticket.
Do I need to print my ticket and bring it to the conference?
No, you can print your ticket or open your ticket on your phone when you check in.
Will the conference have wifi?
Yes.
Are you providing captioning or language translation?
Send us a note at events@github.com if you need these services—we’ll make sure you’re set up with everything you need to enjoy the event.
Will there be a nursing room on site?
Yes, we’ve arranged a private room for nursing, and we can provide refrigeration upon request.
Will there be gender neutral bathrooms on site?
Yes.
What should I do if I don’t want my photograph taken?
Please inform our Registration Team, and they’ll give you a red lanyard.
Will there be a place for me to store things?
Yes, we’ll have a coat check area. You’re welcome to drop off luggage, but please don’t leave valuables.
Where do I go if I lose something?
If the event is in progress, stop by the Help Desk to check if someone dropped off your lost item. After the event, send us a note with a description of the item at events@github.com.
Can I get a refund for my ticket?
Yes, you can get a refund for Git Merge 2019 through January 15th. After that day we will no longer be offering refunds.
Can I change the name on my ticket?
Yes, you can manage the name on your ticket through eventbrite.
I am on the waitlist for workshops. When will I be informed if I am given a spot?
We’ll email you before the Workshop Day if a spot opens up. Please note: We will not be admitting people to Workshop Day if they aren’t registered on the day of the event.
Will the event be recorded or live streamed?
Workshops will not be recorded, but recordings of all Conference Day sessions will be available shortly after the event. This event will not be live streamed.
Do you provide breakfast and lunch?
A light breakfast of grab-and-go items and a full lunch will be served on both days.
What time are meals served?
You can see meal times in our event schedule. Please leave enough time to pick up your badge and grab a bite to eat before start time.
We provide vegetarian, vegan, dairy-free, and gluten-free options. If you have additional dietary needs, please let us know at least 48 hours in advance, and we’ll do our best to provide an option that works for you.
Where and when is the Git Merge cocktail reception?
The cocktail reception will be at the Egg directly after the conference from 5:45pm-8pm. Complimentary beverages and light bites will be served.
Do I need my badge for entry?
Yes, all attendees will need to keep their badge for the reception.
Will non-alcoholic beverages be available?
Yes.
Can people who aren’t attending the conference join?
At this time we are unable to accommodate people who are not registered for Git Merge 2019.
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