Git Merge 2020: March 4

The Majestic Downtown, Los Angeles

One conference. All things Git.

Over 300 developers joined us for technical talks, hands-on workshops, and breakout discussions about Git—and the people who build the world’s technologies with it.

About

About Git Merge

Git Merge is dedicated to amplifying new voices in the Git community and showcasing the most thought-provoking projects from developers, maintainers, and teams around the world.

The 6th annual Git Merge was hosted at The Majestic Downtown in Los Angeles on March 4, 2020. Ticket proceeds were donated to the Software Freedom Conservancy.

Speakers

Speakers

  • Robert Coup headshot

    Robert Coup

    CTO, Koordinates

    Robert Coup is the co-founder and head of technology at Koordinates, where his team powers open geospatial data distribution. He is a passionate open source developer and has spent far too many years manipulating all forms of geodata. Robert is a New Zealander now living in Scotland, where he spends his spare time sailing.

    Session

    9:15am | March 4

    Sno: Building on Git for Versioning Datasets

    Git and distributed version control systems have made advanced development workflows the norm, allowing independent developers, teams, and organizations to collaborate on software. At the same time, we are drowning in data, and for professional data wranglers in many industries, “auckland-mar2020-final-2-fixes-1-final.zip” is still the go-to for data versioning. In this talk, Robert Coup will discuss how Koordinates built an open source version control system on top of Git that's aimed at spacial databases (0-50GB) and their users. Attendees can expect to learn how to combine Git features to work with large repositories, how to use Git as the plumbing layer inside another tool, and more.

  • Garima Singh headshot

    Garima Singh

    Software Engineer, Microsoft

    Garima Singh is a software engineer at Microsoft, working in the Git Ecosystem Team. The Git Ecosystem Team at Microsoft specializes in the client experience for the largest Git repositories ever, and brings that experience to the rest of the community. Garima started contributing Git in late August 2019 and is currently working on adding changed path Bloom filters to the commit-graph.

    Session

    2:30pm | March 4

    Stump the Experts

  • Patrick Hiesel headshot

    Patrick Hiesel

    Software Engineer, Google

    Patrick is passionate about fast, scalable infrastructure. As an engineer at Google, he contributes to Gerrit Code Review, making code review for Google’s largest open-source projects faster and more delightful. He is serving as a maintainer in the Gerrit open-source project and a member of the engineering steering committee. When not at work, you can find Patrick skiing or hiking.

    Session

    9:45am | March 4

    NoteDb: An adventure where Git is your database

    Git makes a great general-purpose database because it provides significant benefits in consistency, reliability, and audit logging. But it's probably nobody's first choice for a database, and turning it into one presents unique challenges. Hear why Patrick and his team decided to use Git as their database for the Gerrit Project (an open source code-review system) and the challenges they ran into along the way.

  • CB Bailey headshot

    CB Bailey

    Software Developer, Bloomberg

    CB is a Git user, advocate and contributor and relishes any opportunity to slice through knotty problems with their Git knowledge and to teach others to do the same. They work for Bloomberg in Software Infrastructure where they write tools and libraries that enable application developers to write robust and efficient services.

    Session

    2:30pm | March 4

    Stump the Experts

  • Tianyu Pu headshot

    Tianyu Pu

    Software Developer, Booking.com

    Tianyu Pu is a full-stack web developer with a strong passion for learning and teaching. Her background is in computer science and quantitative finance. Apart from Tianyu’s technical interests, you will find her geeking out about nutrition, physiology and physical training, and classical piano, among other things.

    Session

    11:00am | March 4

    The Zen of Git

    Git is a version control system that's widely used and often misunderstood. Is it possible to really understand how it works, and maybe even enjoy using it? In this talk, it's Tianyu's goal to get you there. This session is for anyone who has used Git before and would like to learn more about how it works, so they can have a less fearful and more productive time using it in their day-to-day workflow. Using hand-drawn illustrations, Tianyu plans to talk about the internals of Git, including how objects are stored, and how things like branches and tags fit into this representation. Using her illustrations as a foundation, she'll dive further, making commonly used commands easier to understand and implement.

  • Elijah Newren headshot

    Elijah Newren

    Software Engineer, Palantir Technologies

    Elijah Newren currently works at Palantir Technologies where they let him pick his own title for business cards, and he couldn't come up with anything more creative than "Software Engineer". He was, once upon a time, heavily involved in the Gnome open source desktop community, is the creator of Git-filter-repo, and works on various aspects of Git, including the merge machinery. He is a proud member of the league of non-adventurous eaters, and he and his wife have eight children ranging in age from almost one to senior in high school.

    Session

    11:30am | March 4

    Scaling the Merge Machinery

    An overlooked dimension of scaling Git is dealing with large numbers of renames. Refactoring workflows can result in many renamed files—particularly when top-level directories are renamed—and this can pose a challenge for Git's on-the-fly rename detection. Palantir Technologies’s efforts to optimize rename detection uncovered multiple different strategies to tackle the problem, and also turned up a few opportunities to optimize the merge machinery for cases without any renames. In this talk, Elijah Newren will provide a high-level overview of the merge machinery and how it is used, the ideas and insights being leveraged to optimize these codepaths, and some early results from the optimization work.

  • Derrick Stolee headshot

    Derrick Stolee

    Principal Software Engineer, Microsoft

    Derrick Stolee is a Git contributor, focusing on performance features such as the commit-graph and multi-pack-index. The Git Ecosystem Team at Microsoft specializes in the client experience for the largest Git repositories ever, and brings that experience to the rest of the community.

    Session

    12:00pm | March 4

    Git at Scale for Everyone

    Repositories never get smaller. As your team grows, your repositories grow even faster. Git is growing, too. Luckily, the community is improving Git's performance to tackle the many dimensions of scale. Microsoft supports the largest Git repositories—Windows and Office—so Derrick Stolee’s team has a unique perspective on Git at scale. In his talk, he’ll share strategies that keep Git fast, including how to design your engineering system to take advantage of tools like sparse-checkout, fsmonitor, and partial clone. When combined with a "microservices in a monorepo" design, your team will feel like they are working with a small repository while contributing to a large project. Derrick will also share his tools to help Git manage large repositories, so your team can stop waiting on Git and can get back to what you do best.

  • Christian Schilling headshot

    Christian Schilling

    Senior Software Engineer, ESR Labs AG

    Christian is a Senior Software Engineer at ESR Labs, where he develops embedded software that already runs in millions of cars. He is also a major driving force in scaling the company’s version control infrastructure to account for increased complexity and shortened cycles of embedded software development.

    Session

    1:30pm | March 4

    Virtualization for Monorepos

    At ESR Labs AG, Christian Schilling and his team have implemented a novel approach to the monorepo strategy. Their tool acts as a proxy between a Git server and its clients, and is capable of transforming history on demand, enabling users to pull from and push to smaller virtual repositories. This helps to ease the transition to a monorepo from other existing setups. Christian's presentation explains the motivation behind the development of Josh and shows how his team uses the tool to solve many problems common in growing organizations and repositories.

  • Elle Meredith headshot

    Elle Meredith

    Consultant, Blackmill

    Elle has been writing Ruby for over a decade. Currently at Blackmill, previously Development Director at thoughtbot NY. Elle believes in writing clean code, driven by automatic tests, with agile practices, an even work/life balance, and a respectful and inclusive team culture. Recently, she developed and ran an apprenticeship program for Qantas Hotels, up-skilling less experienced developers. When not immersed in the Ruby community, she's probably immersed in water, or lately in flour. You can talk to her on Twitter at @aemeredith.

    Session

    3:30pm | March 4

    Storytelling with Git rebase

    In a successful software development project, a key challenge is to manage complexity because projects get very complex very quickly, even within small teams. Version control is the tool for communicating intent in our codebase over the lifetime of the project.

    In this workshop, you will learn to use Git commit messages to keep track of the intent of your code changes. You will also learn the mechanics of interactive rebasing, how to merge conflicts without losing precious code and how to auto-squash commits. Basically, stop fearing interactive rebasing.

    Pre-Requisites - Git & a text editor of your choice

  • Denver Gingerich headshot

    Denver Gingerich

    FLOSS License Compliance Engineer, Software Freedom Conservancy

    Denver is the FLOSS License Compliance Engineer at Software Freedom Conservancy (Git's fiscal home), managing the technical side of Conservancy's compliance work part-time, triaging new reports and verifying complete corresponding source (CCS). Denver is also the founder and lead developer of JMP(.chat), a free-as-in-freedom chat gateway that lets you text and call people using a real phone number without a phone. His roles elsewhere have involved writing system software for hardware companies, including Linux driver writing at ATI (now AMD) and Qualcomm, as well as modifying free software in his spare time, with patches accepted into Wine, Linux, and GNU wdiff. He gives presentations about digital civil rights and protecting the free software community, having spoken at conferences such as CopyCamp Toronto, FOSSLC's Summercamp, the Open Video Conference, LinuxCon North America, Texas Linux Fest, DebConf, LibrePlanet, and Radical Networks.

    Session

    9:00am | March 4

    Welcome / History & Future of Git

    2:30pm | March 4

    Stump the Experts

  • Emily Shaffer headshot

    Emily Shaffer

    Software Engineer, Google

    Emily Shaffer is a software engineer at Google working on Git. Since 2017, she has been a regular contributor to open source. She's passionate about software best practices, regular expressions, and her dog, Crash Override.

    Session

    2:15pm | March 4

    Lightning talk - Hack the Project Onboarding Process: Learning by Writing

    Poor onboarding documentation can make it difficult for new developers to understand and contribute to an open source project. Inspired by her own experience bootstrapping on a Git project, Emily Shaffer’s talk will cover strategies for improving this documentation—making onboarding more efficient, instructive, and rewarding.

  • Zeger-Jan van de Weg headshot

    Zeger-Jan van de Weg

    Engineering Manager, Gitaly, GitLab

    Zeger-Jan is a husband, and father of two awesome kids. In his spare time he spends time with his family, plays board games, and watch TV shows. Writes in Golang for fun and profit, where Ruby is his goto scripting languages.

    Session

    2:30pm | March 4

    Stump the Experts

  • Jenna Ritten headshot

    Jenna Ritten

    Cloud Software Developer, IBM

    Jenna Ritten (@jritten) is a cloud software developer turned developer advocate for IBM Cloud. She works on expanding the reach of IBM's technology to Austin's open source developer community. Her areas of interest include hackathons, design-thinking workshops, NLU/NLP, gamification, and Blockchain technologies. Originally from Detroit, prior to living in Austin Jenna was living in San Francisco where she attended Dev Bootcamp to learn full-stack web development and transitioned from a career in healthcare. She mainly works in Ruby and Javascript, however, she also teaches Python at a local Austin high school as an instructor for Code2College. She is passionate about Blockchain technologies and their applications to provide global impact to developing countries. She is a strong believer in supporting underrepresented and non-traditional people in tech, much like herself, and providing support by building and fostering communities that need it the most.

    Session

    2:00pm | March 4

    Lightning Talk - Git Cloud Native Applications Up & Running in Under 10 Minutes Using IBM’s Developer Tools CLI

    Whether you are an experienced developer or just starting your career, creating an app from scratch is never easy. This is especially true when learning a new language. We tend to leverage examples or tutorials as a base and iterate from there. This alone can be daunting, and we have not yet considered testing and deployment of the app yet. Luckily, IBM’s Cloud Developer Tools CLI can help you overcome these issues. The Cloud Developer Tools CLI is a command-line driven tool for creating and deploying applications to IBM Cloud, and the tool uses two containers to facilitate building and testing of applications.

    4:30pm | March 4

    The “How-To" of Creating Open Source Content

    Writing documentation for your team is one thing, but writing content that anyone can follow, who doesn’t necessarily understand all the tech jargin, and incorporating the tools you need to get things working properly can be very tricky. I have some tips and tricks that can make this process much easier and a roadmap for making writing technical documentation feel like a breeze. Think of this workshop as the “How-To" of writing technical content. We will explore best practices for writing content that anyone at any skill level can understand and follow. I will also introduce GitBooks and show you how to make your content look more streamlined and professional.

    Pre-Requisites - GitHub Account & IBM Cloud Account, Sign Up @ http://ibm.biz/gitmerge2020

  • Edward Thomson headshot

    Edward Thomson

    Staff Product Manager, GitHub

    Edward Thomson is a Product Manager for GitHub Actions. Previously, he was a software engineer, building version control tools at Microsoft, GitHub and SourceGear. He is the co-maintainer of the libgit2 project, an author of books and video training about using Git, and the co-host of All Things Git, the podcast about Git.

    Session

    10:15am | March 4

    Git workflows: which one's right for you?

    Fifteen years ago, when Git was created, typical development models looked very different. Centralized version control systems and long-lived feature branches were dominant. But today, leaner, trunk-based development strategies are the recommended best practice. A look at the pros and cons of some different strategies from the mailing list approach to Git Flow to different forms of trunk-based development, and how you can choose a workflow where you're successful.

    2:30pm | March 4

    Stump the Experts

Schedule

Schedule

Save a seat for our main-stage lineup featuring stories from Git experts.

Don’t miss the Git Merge workshops and small-group discussions. Keep an eye out for the registration email after you purchase your conference ticket asking you to register for two workshops, two discussions, or one of each.

Mainstage

Gathering Hall

8:00am

Registration ✏️ & Breakfast 🍩

10:45am

Break ☕️

12:30pm

Lunch 🍔 🥗 🍕

2:00pm

Lightning Talk - Git Cloud Native Applications Up & Running in Under 10 Minutes Using IBM’s Developer Tools CLI

Lightning Talk - Git Cloud Native Applications Up & Running in Under 10 Minutes Using IBM’s Developer Tools CLI

March 4 | 2:00pm

Whether you are an experienced developer or just starting your career, creating an app from scratch is never easy. This is especially true when learning a new language. We tend to leverage examples or tutorials as a base and iterate from there. This alone can be daunting, and we have not yet considered testing and deployment of the app yet. Luckily, IBM’s Cloud Developer Tools CLI can help you overcome these issues. The Cloud Developer Tools CLI is a command-line driven tool for creating and deploying applications to IBM Cloud, and the tool uses two containers to facilitate building and testing of applications.

Speaker: Jenna Ritten

Cloud Software Developer, IBM

Jenna Ritten (@jritten) is a cloud software developer turned developer advocate for IBM Cloud. She works on expanding the reach of IBM's technology to Austin's open source developer community. Her areas of interest include hackathons, design-thinking workshops, NLU/NLP, gamification, and Blockchain technologies. Originally from Detroit, prior to living in Austin Jenna was living in San Francisco where she attended Dev Bootcamp to learn full-stack web development and transitioned from a career in healthcare. She mainly works in Ruby and Javascript, however, she also teaches Python at a local Austin high school as an instructor for Code2College. She is passionate about Blockchain technologies and their applications to provide global impact to developing countries. She is a strong believer in supporting underrepresented and non-traditional people in tech, much like herself, and providing support by building and fostering communities that need it the most.

Jenna Ritten headshot

Jenna Ritten, IBM

coworking & conversations<

2:30pm

Stump the Experts

Stump the Experts

March 4 | 2:30pm

Speaker: Denver Gingerich

FLOSS License Compliance Engineer, Software Freedom Conservancy

Denver is the FLOSS License Compliance Engineer at Software Freedom Conservancy (Git's fiscal home), managing the technical side of Conservancy's compliance work part-time, triaging new reports and verifying complete corresponding source (CCS). Denver is also the founder and lead developer of JMP(.chat), a free-as-in-freedom chat gateway that lets you text and call people using a real phone number without a phone. His roles elsewhere have involved writing system software for hardware companies, including Linux driver writing at ATI (now AMD) and Qualcomm, as well as modifying free software in his spare time, with patches accepted into Wine, Linux, and GNU wdiff. He gives presentations about digital civil rights and protecting the free software community, having spoken at conferences such as CopyCamp Toronto, FOSSLC's Summercamp, the Open Video Conference, LinuxCon North America, Texas Linux Fest, DebConf, LibrePlanet, and Radical Networks.

Denver Gingerich headshot

Speaker: Garima Singh

Software Engineer, Microsoft

Garima Singh is a software engineer at Microsoft, working in the Git Ecosystem Team. The Git Ecosystem Team at Microsoft specializes in the client experience for the largest Git repositories ever, and brings that experience to the rest of the community. Garima started contributing Git in late August 2019 and is currently working on adding changed path Bloom filters to the commit-graph.

Garima Singh headshot

Speaker: Zeger-Jan van de Weg

Engineering Manager, Gitaly, GitLab

Zeger-Jan is a husband, and father of two awesome kids. In his spare time he spends time with his family, plays board games, and watch TV shows. Writes in Golang for fun and profit, where Ruby is his goto scripting languages.

Zeger-Jan van de Weg headshot

Speaker: Edward Thomson

Staff Product Manager, GitHub

Edward Thomson is a Product Manager for GitHub Actions. Previously, he was a software engineer, building version control tools at Microsoft, GitHub and SourceGear. He is the co-maintainer of the libgit2 project, an author of books and video training about using Git, and the co-host of All Things Git, the podcast about Git.

Edward Thomson headshot

Speaker: CB Bailey

Software Developer, Bloomberg

CB is a Git user, advocate and contributor and relishes any opportunity to slice through knotty problems with their Git knowledge and to teach others to do the same. They work for Bloomberg in Software Infrastructure where they write tools and libraries that enable application developers to write robust and efficient services.

CB Bailey headshot

Denver Gingerich, Software Freedom Conservancy

Garima Singh, Microsoft

Zeger-Jan van de Weg, GitLab

Edward Thomson, GitHub

CB Bailey, Bloomberg

coworking & conversations<

3:00pm

Break ☕️

4:30pm

The “How-To" of Creating Open Source Content

The “How-To" of Creating Open Source Content

March 4 | 4:30pm

Writing documentation for your team is one thing, but writing content that anyone can follow, who doesn’t necessarily understand all the tech jargin, and incorporating the tools you need to get things working properly can be very tricky. I have some tips and tricks that can make this process much easier and a roadmap for making writing technical documentation feel like a breeze. Think of this workshop as the “How-To" of writing technical content. We will explore best practices for writing content that anyone at any skill level can understand and follow. I will also introduce GitBooks and show you how to make your content look more streamlined and professional.

Pre-Requisites - GitHub Account & IBM Cloud Account, Sign Up @ http://ibm.biz/gitmerge2020

Speaker: Jenna Ritten

Cloud Software Developer, IBM

Jenna Ritten (@jritten) is a cloud software developer turned developer advocate for IBM Cloud. She works on expanding the reach of IBM's technology to Austin's open source developer community. Her areas of interest include hackathons, design-thinking workshops, NLU/NLP, gamification, and Blockchain technologies. Originally from Detroit, prior to living in Austin Jenna was living in San Francisco where she attended Dev Bootcamp to learn full-stack web development and transitioned from a career in healthcare. She mainly works in Ruby and Javascript, however, she also teaches Python at a local Austin high school as an instructor for Code2College. She is passionate about Blockchain technologies and their applications to provide global impact to developing countries. She is a strong believer in supporting underrepresented and non-traditional people in tech, much like herself, and providing support by building and fostering communities that need it the most.

Jenna Ritten headshot

Jenna Ritten, IBM

Birds of a Feather Topic 2

5:30pm

Reception @ Reserve

Experience

Experience

01

Getting to Git Merge

Travel tips for every leg of your trip.

Where:
The Majestic Downtown, Los Angeles

When:
March 4, 2020 8 - 8pm

By plane:
We recommend flying into Bob Hope (Burbank) International Airport (16.9 miles away from the venue) or LAX International Airport (17.9 miles away from the venue).

By car:
Public parking lots are available near the venue at your own cost. See parking lot map. You’ll also find a variety of ridesharing and rental car services in the Los Angeles area.

By public transport:
The venue is walking distance from the 7th & Metro Station and Pershing Square Station.

You’ll find lots of hotels and AirBnBs near the venue. Here are a few of our favorite hotels that are walking distance to the venue:

Ace Hotel

929 S Broadway,
Los Angeles, CA 90015
Special Git Merge pricing ($239 nightly rate) when you book with this.

Freehand Hotel

416 W. 8th St.
Los Angeles, CA 90014

Tuck Hotel

820 S Spring St
Los Angeles, CA 90014
Special Git Merge pricing ($219 nightly rate) while supplies last. Book with bonus code, GITHUB.
02

Closing Reception

Where:
The Majestic Downtown, Los Angeles

When:
March 4, 2020 6pm - 8pm

We’ll be closing out the day with a reception at The Majestic. Unwind from the day, meet more attendees, and enjoy a cocktail and light bites.

03

Beyond Git Merge

Looking for more to do while you’re in town? Join nearby events hosted by our sponsors. More details coming soon.

FAQ

FAQ

Will Git Merge continue as planned on March 4?
Git Merge will still take place as planned on March 4, but we understand that you may be concerned about how the coronavirus will impact the event. We want to reassure you that our events team and Workplace Safety and Security teams are actively monitoring the situation closely. We’ve evaluated the current risk inside the United States, as well as guidelines from global health organizations, and have decided to move forward with the event this week. Our foremost priority is the health and safety of our attendees, and our strategy is consistent with recommendations from the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
What steps are being taken to limit the risk?

We have worked with the Majestic Downtown Los Angeles event space to take extra precautions over and above the normal flu season cleaning and disinfecting protocol, including:

  • Manual disinfection of all high-traffic areas 30 minutes prior to registration.
  • Frequent wipe-downs throughout the event of all common touch areas, including registration counters, door knobs, lecterns, microphones, stair handrails, trash receptacles, food and beverage stations, and in and around the restrooms.
  • An increased number of hand sanitizer stations and disinfectant wipes throughout the venue, including check-in counter, main stage and breakout room (for speaker computers and microphones), mother’s room, and communal gathering spaces.
  • Designated personnel from our Workplace Safety and Security team on-site to handle emergencies.
  • First Aid station located at registration.
Where can I find real-time updates on COVID-19?
CDC is providing global travel restriction updates and guidance here. Both the CDC and WHO have pulled together recommendations for the public to take care of themselves and protect others.
Can I get a receipt for my ticket?
Yes, send us a note at events@github.com.
Do I need an ID for the event?
Yes, please bring a form of ID that matches the name on your ticket when you check in.
Do I need to print my ticket and bring it to the conference?
No, we can find your ticket using the name on your ID.
Do you offer scholarships?
Yes, we offer a limited number of scholarships to attend Git Merge. Whether you’re from an underrepresented group in technology, an enrolled student, or an active open source maintainer within our community, we have set up scholarships to bring you to Git Merge. If you’d like to be considered, email us with “Scholarship request” as the subject for more information.
Are there items I’m not allowed to bring into the venue?

Yes, the following items are prohibited inside the The Majestic:

  • Weapons of any kind, including but not limited to:
    • Firearms (with or without permit)
    • Pocket knives, multi-tools, or knives of any size
    • Pepper spray or mace
  • Flares or fireworks
  • Oversized bags (i.e. roller luggage or duffle bags) or backpacks 18.5 inches or larger
  • Illegal substances
  • Clothing with offensive language or content
  • Audio or video recording devices
  • Signs, banners, or poles
  • Skateboards, hoverboards, rollerblades, scooters, bicycles, or bobsleds
  • Hoods, masks, or the like or objects to cover one’s face (medical and religious articles exempt)
  • Balloons, permanent markers, spray paint, silly string
  • Noisemaking devices (e.g. air horns, drums, whistles)
  • Large or pointed umbrellas
  • Projectiles (footballs, frisbees, etc.)
  • Amplifiers or musical instruments

GitHub and The Majestic reserve the right to prohibit any item, including items not listed above, from entering the premises. All bags and items may be searched.

What are the parking options at the venue?
Public parking lots are available near the venue at your own cost.
Will the conference have wifi?
Yes.
Are you providing captioning or language translation?
Reach out to us by February 14 if you need these services. We’ll do our best to set you up with everything you need to enjoy the event.
Will there be a nursing room on site?
Yes, we’ve arranged a private room for nursing, and we can provide refrigeration upon request.
Will there be gender neutral bathrooms on site?
Yes.
What should I do if I don’t want my photograph taken?
Please inform our Registration Team, and they’ll give you a red lanyard.
Will there be a place for me to store things?
Yes, we’ll have a coat check area. You’re welcome to drop off luggage, but please don’t leave valuables.
Where do I go if I lose something?
If the event is in progress, stop by the Help Desk to check if someone dropped off your lost item. After the event, send us a note with a description of the item at events@github.com.
Can I get a refund for my ticket?
Yes, you can get a refund for Git Merge 2020. To request a refund:
  • Log in to your Eventbrite account
  • Click Tickets in the drop-down menu on your profile photo in the top-right corner
  • Click Git Merge 2020
  • Click Request a Refund and complete the form
How do I change the name or selections on my ticket?
Log into your Eventbrite account or open your ticket confirmation email:
  • Find Order summary details
  • Click View and manage your online order
  • Find Edit your ticket type
  • Make necessary updates to the ticket profile and hit save
I’m on the waitlist for workshops. When will I be informed if I am given a spot?
We’ll email you at least 24 hours before the event if a spot opens up. Note: We won’t be admitting attendees into workshops if they aren’t registered on the day of the event.
Will the event be recorded or live streamed?
Sessions were not able to be recorded this year, we are sorry for the inconvenience.
What can you tell me about the afternoon breakout options, including workshops and Birds of Feather discussions? Do I need to register in advance?
As part of your ticket, you’ll be invited to participate in two 50-minute breakout sessions in the afternoon. You can choose from workshops or small group Birds of a Feather discussions. Once the workshop and discussion topics are finalized by early February, you can expect an email, which will invite you to register. Registering for these sessions is required, as space will be limited. Note: Participants can register for two workshops, two Birds of a Feather discussions, or one of each.
Can I contribute Birds of a Feather topic ideas?
When you buy tickets, you'll be given a chance to suggest Birds of a Feather topic ideas. If you have already purchased your ticket, send us an email to suggest topics.
How do I facilitate a discussion?
If you would like to be considered to facilitate, select the appropriate box at check-out and we will follow up in early February when topics are selected.
Do you provide breakfast and lunch?
A light breakfast, full lunch, and snacks will be served with vegetarian, vegan, dairy-free, and gluten-free options.
What time are meals served?
You can see meal times in our event schedule. Please leave enough time to pick up your badge and grab a bite to eat before start time.
We provide vegetarian, vegan, dairy-free, and gluten-free options. If you have additional dietary needs, please let us know by Friday, February 21st, and we’ll do our best to provide an option that works for you. Requests made after this cut off may not be available.
Where and when is the Git Merge closing reception?
The reception will be at The Majestic after the conference, from 6-8 pm. Complimentary beverages and light bites will be served.
Do I need my badge for entry?
Yes, all attendees will need to keep their badge to join the reception.
Will non-alcoholic beverages be available?
Yes.
Can I bring a guest to the reception?
Only registered attendees with a badge will be permitted to attend the closing reception.
Venue Quesitons
Help Desk
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